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March 16th 09, 03:30 PM
The Wall Street Journal
MARCH 16, 2009, 11:06 A.M. ET

Foreigners Unload U.S. Securities

By TOM BARKLEY

WASHINGTON -- Net foreign sales of long-maturity U.S. securities
totaled $60.9 billion in January, following purchases of $24.3 billion
the month before, according to a U.S. Treasury Department report
released Monday.

The monthly Treasury report highlights cross-border acquisitions of
securities with maturities of more than one year including nonmarket
transactions such as stock swaps and principal repayment on asset-
backed securities.

The closely watched figure, excluding transactions that don't occur on
an open market, recorded net selling of $43.0 billion in long-term
U.S. securities, after purchases of $34.7 billion in December,
according to the monthly Treasury International Capital report, known
as TIC.

The report's most comprehensive category, "monthly net TIC flows,"
includes nonmarket flows, short-term securities and changes in banks'
dollar holdings. This measure of net foreign capital outflow was a
record $148.9 billion in January, versus an inflow of $86.2 billion
the previous month.

Financial market analysts consider the monthly data from the Treasury
Department to be a significant but imprecise gauge of how easily the
U.S. can finance its trade deficit. The January TIC flow compares with
the $36.03 billion trade deficit during the month, which was the
smallest gap since 2002.

Michael Woolfolk, senior currency strategist at the Bank of New York
Mellon, said the big outflows are a concern and could represent a
trend away from the flight to quality that has boosted purchases in
U.S. assets in recent months.

"This was a truly awful report, throwing into question the funding of
the U.S. current account deficit," he said in a statement. "The irony
is that the deterioration in the TICS data was largely due to an
alleviation in risk averse, safe-haven purchases of [dollar]-
denominated deposits and the return of U.S. investors to the foreign
bond market."

Within the long-term securities category, foreign net purchases of
U.S. Treasury notes and bonds totaled $10.7 billion in January,
compared with net purchases of $15.0 billion the month before.

Private foreign investors bought a net $12.7 billion in Treasury notes
and bonds in January, after buying $11.8 billion in December.
Meanwhile, foreign official institutions such as central banks sold a
net $1.9 billion of these Treasurys, compared with net purchases of
$3.9 billion the month before.

Net foreign sales of debt issued by U.S. government-sponsored agencies
like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac totaled $22.5 billion in January,
compared with $37.4 billion in sales in December.

For U.S. equities, net foreign purchases totaled $1.4 billion in
January, compared with purchases of $3.9 billion the previous month.

For corporate bonds, net foreign sales were $8.4 billion, versus
purchases totaling $41.0 billion the previous month.

China, according to the December data, remained the largest holder of
U.S. Treasury securities, having surpassed Japan late last year.
China's holdings totaled $739.6 billion, followed by Japan's $634.8
billion and $186.3 billion among oil exporters

Tony Crescenzi, chief bond-market strategist at Miller Tabak & Co.,
said net selling by Caribbean banking centers and Luxembourg could be
related to the scandal involving financier Bernard L. Madoff.

Sales in those two areas "reek of hedge-fund selling and quite
possibly from investors who were Madoff-ed," said Crescenzi. The next
report, covering February, is scheduled for release April 15.

-- Emily Barrett in New York contributed to this article.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123720924692940901.html

PeterL
March 16th 09, 03:51 PM
On Mar 16, 8:30*am, wrote:
> The Wall Street Journal
> MARCH 16, 2009, 11:06 A.M. ET
>
> Foreigners Unload U.S. Securities
>
> By TOM BARKLEY
>
> WASHINGTON -- Net foreign sales of long-maturity U.S. securities
> totaled $60.9 billion in January, following purchases of $24.3 billion
> the month before, according to a U.S. Treasury Department report
> released Monday.
>
> The monthly Treasury report highlights cross-border acquisitions of
> securities with maturities of more than one year including nonmarket
> transactions such as stock swaps and principal repayment on asset-
> backed securities.
>
> The closely watched figure, excluding transactions that don't occur on
> an open market, recorded net selling of $43.0 billion in long-term
> U.S. securities, after purchases of $34.7 billion in December,
> according to the monthly Treasury International Capital report, known
> as TIC.
>
> The report's most comprehensive category, "monthly net TIC flows,"
> includes nonmarket flows, short-term securities and changes in banks'
> dollar holdings. This measure of net foreign capital outflow was a
> record $148.9 billion in January, versus an inflow of $86.2 billion
> the previous month.
>
> Financial market analysts consider the monthly data from the Treasury
> Department to be a significant but imprecise gauge of how easily the
> U.S. can finance its trade deficit. The January TIC flow compares with
> the $36.03 billion trade deficit during the month, which was the
> smallest gap since 2002.
>
> Michael Woolfolk, senior currency strategist at the Bank of New York
> Mellon, said the big outflows are a concern and could represent a
> trend away from the flight to quality that has boosted purchases in
> U.S. assets in recent months.
>
> "This was a truly awful report, throwing into question the funding of
> the U.S. current account deficit," he said in a statement. "The irony
> is that the deterioration in the TICS data was largely due to an
> alleviation in risk averse, safe-haven purchases of [dollar]-
> denominated deposits and the return of U.S. investors to the foreign
> bond market."
>
> Within the long-term securities category, foreign net purchases of
> U.S. Treasury notes and bonds totaled $10.7 billion in January,
> compared with net purchases of $15.0 billion the month before.
>
> Private foreign investors bought a net $12.7 billion in Treasury notes
> and bonds in January, after buying $11.8 billion in December.
> Meanwhile, foreign official institutions such as central banks sold a
> net $1.9 billion of these Treasurys, compared with net purchases of
> $3.9 billion the month before.
>
> Net foreign sales of debt issued by U.S. government-sponsored agencies
> like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac totaled $22.5 billion in January,
> compared with $37.4 billion in sales in December.
>
> For U.S. equities, net foreign purchases totaled $1.4 billion in
> January, compared with purchases of $3.9 billion the previous month.
>
> For corporate bonds, net foreign sales were $8.4 billion, versus
> purchases totaling $41.0 billion the previous month.
>
> China, according to the December data, remained the largest holder of
> U.S. Treasury securities, having surpassed Japan late last year.
> China's holdings totaled $739.6 billion, followed by Japan's $634.8
> billion and $186.3 billion among oil exporters
>
> Tony Crescenzi, chief bond-market strategist at Miller Tabak & Co.,
> said net selling by Caribbean banking centers and Luxembourg could be
> related to the scandal involving financier Bernard L. Madoff.
>
> Sales in those two areas "reek of hedge-fund selling and quite
> possibly from investors who were Madoff-ed," said Crescenzi. The next
> report, covering February, is scheduled for release April 15.
>
> -- Emily Barrett in New York contributed to this article.
>
> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123720924692940901.html


"Madoff-ed, it's going to be a new word in our dictionary.

March 16th 09, 04:25 PM
people are moving out of long term and moving back into the stock
market.


"THE BLACK HAND" is the name of the international
terrorist group that is causing all the problems.

BuffetHater
March 17th 09, 01:12 AM
On Mar 16, 11:25*am, wrote:
> people are moving out of long term and moving back into the stock
> market.
>
> * * "THE BLACK HAND" is the name of the international
> terrorist group that is causing all the problems.

They are dumping bonds and stocks in anything american because
america is finished !!!
Dummies like comix will be bag holders, bags full of ****.

March 17th 09, 02:33 AM
i know i hit the nail on the head when idiot short sellers like
buffethater start throwing "fits".......BWAA
HAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHHAHAA


"THE BLACK HAND" is the name of the international
terrorist group that is causing all the problems.

Adam Russell[_2_]
March 17th 09, 05:47 AM
Doesnt that also mean "americans are buying more US securities"? Cant have
a seller without a buyer.

> wrote in message
...
> The Wall Street Journal
> MARCH 16, 2009, 11:06 A.M. ET
>
> Foreigners Unload U.S. Securities
>
> By TOM BARKLEY
>
> WASHINGTON -- Net foreign sales of long-maturity U.S. securities
> totaled $60.9 billion in January, following purchases of $24.3 billion
> the month before, according to a U.S. Treasury Department report
> released Monday.
>
> The monthly Treasury report highlights cross-border acquisitions of
> securities with maturities of more than one year including nonmarket
> transactions such as stock swaps and principal repayment on asset-
> backed securities.
>
> The closely watched figure, excluding transactions that don't occur on
> an open market, recorded net selling of $43.0 billion in long-term
> U.S. securities, after purchases of $34.7 billion in December,
> according to the monthly Treasury International Capital report, known
> as TIC.
>
> The report's most comprehensive category, "monthly net TIC flows,"
> includes nonmarket flows, short-term securities and changes in banks'
> dollar holdings. This measure of net foreign capital outflow was a
> record $148.9 billion in January, versus an inflow of $86.2 billion
> the previous month.
>
> Financial market analysts consider the monthly data from the Treasury
> Department to be a significant but imprecise gauge of how easily the
> U.S. can finance its trade deficit. The January TIC flow compares with
> the $36.03 billion trade deficit during the month, which was the
> smallest gap since 2002.
>
> Michael Woolfolk, senior currency strategist at the Bank of New York
> Mellon, said the big outflows are a concern and could represent a
> trend away from the flight to quality that has boosted purchases in
> U.S. assets in recent months.
>
> "This was a truly awful report, throwing into question the funding of
> the U.S. current account deficit," he said in a statement. "The irony
> is that the deterioration in the TICS data was largely due to an
> alleviation in risk averse, safe-haven purchases of [dollar]-
> denominated deposits and the return of U.S. investors to the foreign
> bond market."
>
> Within the long-term securities category, foreign net purchases of
> U.S. Treasury notes and bonds totaled $10.7 billion in January,
> compared with net purchases of $15.0 billion the month before.
>
> Private foreign investors bought a net $12.7 billion in Treasury notes
> and bonds in January, after buying $11.8 billion in December.
> Meanwhile, foreign official institutions such as central banks sold a
> net $1.9 billion of these Treasurys, compared with net purchases of
> $3.9 billion the month before.
>
> Net foreign sales of debt issued by U.S. government-sponsored agencies
> like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac totaled $22.5 billion in January,
> compared with $37.4 billion in sales in December.
>
> For U.S. equities, net foreign purchases totaled $1.4 billion in
> January, compared with purchases of $3.9 billion the previous month.
>
> For corporate bonds, net foreign sales were $8.4 billion, versus
> purchases totaling $41.0 billion the previous month.
>
> China, according to the December data, remained the largest holder of
> U.S. Treasury securities, having surpassed Japan late last year.
> China's holdings totaled $739.6 billion, followed by Japan's $634.8
> billion and $186.3 billion among oil exporters
>
> Tony Crescenzi, chief bond-market strategist at Miller Tabak & Co.,
> said net selling by Caribbean banking centers and Luxembourg could be
> related to the scandal involving financier Bernard L. Madoff.
>
> Sales in those two areas "reek of hedge-fund selling and quite
> possibly from investors who were Madoff-ed," said Crescenzi. The next
> report, covering February, is scheduled for release April 15.
>
> -- Emily Barrett in New York contributed to this article.
>
> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123720924692940901.html

Frithiof Jensen
March 17th 09, 05:16 PM
"Adam Russell" > skrev i meddelelsen
...
> Doesnt that also mean "americans are buying more US securities"? Cant
> have a seller without a buyer.

No Worries: Propellerhead Ben will have the FED buy it all - after forcing
pension funds e.t.c. to buy all those crap bond yielding 1% for 30 years!