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Financial Instrument names?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 12th 05, 04:56 PM
Frans van Duinen
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Default Financial Instrument names?

I'm seeing stock exchange symbols like XYZ XYZ.UN or XYZ.SV.A or XYZ.NV. I'm assuming this maps into such
things as commons, trust units and various shades of preferreds, etc.

Is there a list somewhere what these codes mean (on the TSE in particular).

Thanks
--
--
Frans van Duinen
Toronto, Ontario

  #2  
Old February 12th 05, 05:52 PM
darkness39
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..UN is units as in Income Trust Units I believe.

NV is what you call a Dutch company (link Inc. in the US).

I think these codes come off agreed definitions for Reuters and
Bloomberg screens.

  #3  
Old February 12th 05, 06:32 PM
Mike Higgs
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"Frans van Duinen" wrote in message
...

Is there a list somewhere what these codes mean (on the TSE in particular).


At the TSE - http://www.tse.com/en/symbolExtension.html


Regards,
Mike
**********
Email:


  #4  
Old February 12th 05, 08:40 PM
Greg Goss
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Frans van Duinen wrote:

I'm seeing stock exchange symbols like XYZ XYZ.UN or XYZ.SV.A or XYZ.NV. I'm assuming this maps into such
things as commons, trust units and various shades of preferreds, etc.

Is there a list somewhere what these codes mean (on the TSE in particular).


If you find a list, make sure that it's under six months old. Most of
these were changed. My Telus T.A has turned into T.NV (non-voting).
My Cominco shares TEK.B were changed into TEK.SV which I think means
subordinate voting. Units (Trust "shares" are called units of the
trust) have been called whatever.UN for a while, though TD Waterhouse
Research insists on representing them with a caret (EIT^) instead for
some reason that only makes sense to them. I have MDI Technologies in
my watch list, though I've never bit at them. They're MDD.U which I
believe means that they're measured in US dollars. So don't get the
..UN and the .U confused.

Mike gives a link to the NEW suffixes (which reflect voting rights
NV,MV,SV,LV,RV) but doesn't mention the older suffixes UN, U, and
perhaps others.
--
Tomorrow is today already.
Greg Goss, 1989-01-27
  #5  
Old February 14th 05, 08:50 PM
Alan Bowler
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Frans van Duinen wrote:
I'm seeing stock exchange symbols like XYZ XYZ.UN or XYZ.SV.A or
XYZ.NV. I'm assuming this maps into such things as commons, trust units
and various shades of preferreds, etc.


The TSX has been pressuring companies to use a more uniform
coding for different stock classes.

".db" is a debenture. (a really a bond, but it might have
no maturity date, and generally is secured only by the general
assets of the company. It will usually rand behind other bonds.)

".un" indicates a 'unit' of something rather than a 'share'.
These will be units of a trust or a limited partnership.
Under usual circumstances this means you don't have a vote.

".pr" indicates a 'preferred' share. Since companies often
have more than one series of preferred shares there is usually
a letter (.a .b etc.) to distinquish them. It is rare for preferreds
to have any votes (other than in bankruptcy).

The above three have been used for a long time. The new suffixes
are for common shares where there is something other than
one-share-one-vote.

".nv" indicates a common share with no votes. (In theory
you own the same amount of the company as voting share,
but you have to trust the judgement of the people that
hold the voting shares.)

".sv" denotes "subordinate-voting" you get a vote but it doesn't
count as much as the votes of another set of shares. The ratio
of votes can vary from as little as 2:1 to 100:1. 10:1 is common.

".mv" denotes "multiple-voting", These are the shares that
have more votes than the ".sv" (or unsuffixed) shares.

Previously these different share classes would just be
distinquished by a letter suffix, but there was no convention
about what what the voting rights were. In some case it took
quite a bit of digging to find out which was which.

  #6  
Old February 15th 05, 02:07 AM
Frans van Duinen
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Default

Thanks Alan and others.
By now we have here an even more complete list than even the list posted on the TSX web site.

-----------------------------------
Alan Bowler wrote:



Frans van Duinen wrote:

I'm seeing stock exchange symbols like XYZ XYZ.UN or XYZ.SV.A or
XYZ.NV. I'm assuming this maps into such things as commons, trust
units and various shades of preferreds, etc.



The TSX has been pressuring companies to use a more uniform
coding for different stock classes.

".db" is a debenture. (a really a bond, but it might have
no maturity date, and generally is secured only by the general
assets of the company. It will usually rand behind other bonds.)

".un" indicates a 'unit' of something rather than a 'share'.
These will be units of a trust or a limited partnership.
Under usual circumstances this means you don't have a vote.

".pr" indicates a 'preferred' share. Since companies often
have more than one series of preferred shares there is usually
a letter (.a .b etc.) to distinquish them. It is rare for preferreds
to have any votes (other than in bankruptcy).

The above three have been used for a long time. The new suffixes
are for common shares where there is something other than
one-share-one-vote.

".nv" indicates a common share with no votes. (In theory
you own the same amount of the company as voting share,
but you have to trust the judgement of the people that
hold the voting shares.)

".sv" denotes "subordinate-voting" you get a vote but it doesn't
count as much as the votes of another set of shares. The ratio
of votes can vary from as little as 2:1 to 100:1. 10:1 is common.

".mv" denotes "multiple-voting", These are the shares that
have more votes than the ".sv" (or unsuffixed) shares.

Previously these different share classes would just be
distinquished by a letter suffix, but there was no convention
about what what the voting rights were. In some case it took
quite a bit of digging to find out which was which.


--
--
Frans van Duinen
Toronto, Ontario

  #7  
Old February 15th 05, 06:04 PM
Alan Bowler
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Default

Frans van Duinen wrote:
Thanks Alan and others.
By now we have here an even more complete list than even the list posted
on the TSX web site.


But not complete. Glacing at today's paper I see I forgot another
of the long-use suffixes.

".ir" denotes an installment receipt. This is a partially paid for
share. You r get the vote and dividends (if any) of the regular
share, but sometime in the future (usually less than 1 year),
you have an obligation to pay the rest of the share purchase.
These were a fairly common way to sell a large block of shares
a few years ago. However, they are not much used since the
Hurricane Hydrocarbons (now PetroKazakhstan) fiasco.

 




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